10 Cool Gifts Guaranteed to Impress Science Geeks – MOTHERLOADED

Almost everyone looks forward to the Christmas holidays but many dread Christmas shopping! Buying gifts for friends and family can be a daunting task even if you know the likes and dislikes of the people you are buying presents for.

Have you been looking for The Ultimate Cool New Electronic Gadgets, Gizmos and Unique gift idea. Well now EVERYTHING can be found on by shopping the internet! Even if you’re looking for something they haven’t got in the shops, just inquire and they’ll try their best to get it for you! There are so many big boy’s toys and gizmos from gadget & gift shops on the internet. There are so many toys and gizmos available.

Gadgets make fantastic gift Ideas So why not explore the latest gadgets as gift ideas for, birthday presents, or just as that cool gift idea as an unusual gift for him and her for Christmas.
below we explore 10 Science Geek gifts thats sure to be a big hit this Christmas

1. Aerogel

Aerogel is a synthetic porous ultralight material derived from a gel, in which the liquid component of the gel has been replaced with a gas. The result is a solid with extremely low density and low thermal conductivity. Nicknames include frozen smoke, solid smoke, solid air, solid cloud, blue smoke owing to its translucent nature and the way light scatters in the material. It feels like fragile expanded polystyrene to the touch. Aerogels can be made from a variety of chemical compounds.

Aerogel was first created by Samuel Stephens Kistler in 1931, as a result of a bet with Charles Learned over who could replace the liquid in “jellies” with gas without causing shrinkage.

Aerogels are produced by extracting the liquid component of a gel through supercritical drying. This allows the liquid to be slowly dried off without causing the solid matrix in the gel to collapse from capillary action, as would happen with conventional evaporation. The first aerogels were produced from silica gels. Kistler’s later work involved aerogels based on alumina, chromia and tin dioxide. Carbon aerogels were first developed in the late 1980s.

Aerogel does not have a designated material with set chemical formula but the term is used to group all the material with a certain geometric structure.

2. EcoSphere

The Original EcoSphere® is the world’s first totally enclosed ecosystem – a complete, self-contained and self-sustaining miniature world encased in glass. Be wary of inferior and lower quality imitations. Easy to care for, an EcoSphere is an incredible learning tool that can provide powerful insights about life on our own planet… and provide a glimpse of technology that’s shaping the future of space exploration.

3. Mars Rocks

Names for Mars rocks are largely unofficial designations used for ease of discussion purposes, as the International Astronomical Union’s official Martian naming system declares that objects smaller than 100 m (330 ft) are not to be given official names. Because of this, some less significant rocks seen in photos returned by Mars rovers have been named more than once, and others have even had their names changed later due to conflicts or even matters of opinion. Often rocks are named after the children or family members of astronauts or NASA employees. The name “Jazzy”, for example, was taken from a girl named “Jazzy” who grew up in Grand Junction, CO, USA. Her father worked for NASA and contributed to the findings and naming of the rocks.

4. Gömböc

UNIQUE MATHEMATICAL INNOVATION – ‘Gömböc’ (pronounced: ‘goemboets’) is the first and only known homogenous object with one stable and one unstable equilibrium point, thus two equilibria altogether on a horizontal surface. No matter what you do with it, it always gets back to its only stable point of equilibrium.
PERFECT DESK AND SCIENCE TOY – Swinging Gömböc helps you think over your dilemmas, draw your daily inspiration and to remind yourself: it’s just a matter of time to regain your balance.
EXCELLENT GIFT IDEA – looking for a fascinating gift idea to give to your friends, family members, colleagues or partners? Get Gömböc and offer them this unique design gift, a special matter of mathematical curiosity that will never go out of style. Or order this magic self-righting shape and add it to your personal home decoration.
SUPER ELEGANT – ditch those low-level toys and decoration elements and set yourself up with a super elegant mathematical shape that looks great in your home or office. Find inspiration any day with this internationally-acknowledged mathematical innovation!
UNIQUE RESULT OF SPECIAL PRODUCTION – Gömböc products are produced by using CNC (Computer Numerical Control) milling technology. Manufacturing one single Gömböc requires several hours of precision milling. Every hundredth of millimeter counts for Gömböc-type of objects, so we work with high accuracy level. The smallest change in the process can cause a harmful result that the product will lose its “gömböc-self”. That’s why Gömböc is one of the most unique inventions in Mathematics.

5. Violet Laser Pointer

Now, more and more laser pointers and brightest flashlight sold in the market are class IIIB with a power over 5mW. But when the laser directly penetrates into the eyes, there may be some damage. Especially to some high power laser pointers, diffuse light probably damage the eyes, the focus are more likely to ignite flammable materials. Therefore laser pointers are not a toy, not suitable for children. When operating high-power laser, wear special secure glasses would be safe, especially for the invisible laser. In a word, no matter how much power the laser power is, you need to avoid hitting into your eyes.

6. Gallium

Gallium is a chemical element with symbol Ga and atomic number 31. It is in group 13 of the periodic table, and thus has similarities to the other metals of the group, aluminium, indium, and thallium. Gallium does not occur as a free element in nature, but as gallium(III) compounds in trace amounts in zinc ores and in bauxite. Elemental gallium is a soft, silvery blue metal at standard temperature and pressure, a brittle solid at low temperatures, and a liquid at temperatures greater than 29.76 °C (85.57 °F) (above room temperature, but below the normal human body temperature).

The melting point of gallium is used as a temperature reference point. Gallium alloys are used in thermometers as a non-toxic and environmentally friendly alternative to mercury, and can withstand higher temperatures than mercury. The alloy galinstan (68.5% gallium, 21.5% indium, and 10% tin) has an even lower melting point of −19 °C (−2 °F), well below the freezing point of water.

Since its discovery in 1875, gallium has been used to make alloys with low melting points. It is also used in semiconductors as a dopant in semiconductor substrates.

Gallium is predominantly used in electronics. Gallium arsenide, the primary chemical compound of gallium in electronics, is used in microwave circuits, high-speed switching circuits, and infrared circuits. Semiconductive gallium nitride and indium gallium nitride produce blue and violet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and diode lasers. Gallium is also used in the production of artificial gadolinium gallium garnet for jewelry.

Gallium has no known natural role in biology. Gallium(III) behaves in a similar manner to ferric salts in biological systems, and has been used in some medical applications, including pharmaceuticals and radiopharmaceuticals.

7. Miracle Berry

Synsepalum dulcificum is a plant known for its berry that, when eaten, causes sour foods (such as lemons and limes) subsequently consumed to taste sweet. This effect is due to miraculin. Common names for this species and its berry include miracle fruit, miracle berry, miraculous berry, sweet berry, and in West Africa, where the species originates, agbayun, taami, asaa, and ledidi.

The berry itself has a low sugar content and a mildly sweet tang. It contains a glycoprotein molecule, with some trailing carbohydrate chains, called miraculin. When the fleshy part of the fruit is eaten, this molecule binds to the tongue’s taste buds, causing sour foods to taste sweet. At neutral pH, miraculin binds and blocks the receptors, but at low pH (resulting from ingestion of sour foods) miraculin binds proteins and becomes able to activate the sweet receptors, resulting in the perception of sweet taste. This effect lasts until the protein is washed away by saliva (up to about 30 minutes).

The names miracle fruit and miracle berry are shared by Gymnema sylvestre and Thaumatococcus daniellii, which are two other species of plant used to alter the perceived sweetness of foods.

8. DNA Genotyping

Genotyping is the process of determining differences in the genetic make-up (genotype) of an individual by examining the individual’s DNA sequence using biological assays and comparing it to another individual’s sequence or a reference sequence. It reveals the alleles an individual has inherited from their parents.

9. Klein Bottle

In mathematics, the Klein bottle /ˈklaɪn/ is an example of a non-orientable surface; it is a two-dimensional manifold against which a system for determining a normal vector cannot be consistently defined. Informally, it is a one-sided surface which, if traveled upon, could be followed back to the point of origin while flipping the traveler upside down. Other related non-orientable objects include the Möbius strip and the real projective plane. Whereas a Möbius strip is a surface with boundary, a Klein bottle has no boundary (for comparison, a sphere is an orientable surface with no boundary).

The Klein bottle was first described in 1882 by the German mathematician Felix Klein. It may have been originally named the Kleinsche Fläche (“Klein surface”) and then misinterpreted as Kleinsche Flasche (“Klein bottle”), which ultimately may have led to the adoption of this term in the German language as well.

10. Ferrofluid

A ferrofluid (portmanteau of ferromagnetic and fluid) is a liquid that becomes strongly magnetized in the presence of a magnetic field. A grinding process for ferrofluid was invented in 1963 by NASA’s Steve Papell as a liquid rocket fuel that could be drawn toward a pump inlet in a weightless environment by applying a magnetic field. The name ferrofluid was introduced, the process improved, more highly magnetic liquids synthesized (see figure on right), additional carrier liquids discovered, and the physical chemistry elucidated by R.E.Rosensweig and colleagues; in addition Rosensweig evolved a new branch of fluid mechanics termed ferrohydrodynamics.

Ferrofluids are colloidal liquids made of nanoscale ferromagnetic, or ferrimagnetic, particles suspended in a carrier fluid (usually an organic solvent or water). Each tiny particle is thoroughly coated with a surfactant to inhibit clumping. Large ferromagnetic particles can be ripped out of the homogeneous colloidal mixture, forming a separate clump of magnetic dust when exposed to strong magnetic fields. The magnetic attraction of nanoparticles is weak enough that the surfactant’s Van der Waals force is sufficient to prevent magnetic clumping or agglomeration. Ferrofluids usually do not retain magnetization in the absence of an externally applied field and thus are often classified as “superparamagnets” rather than ferromagnets.

The difference between ferrofluids and magnetorheological fluids (MR fluids) is the size of the particles. The particles in a ferrofluid primarily consist of nanoparticles which are suspended by Brownian motion and generally will not settle under normal conditions. MR fluid particles primarily consist of micrometre-scale particles which are too heavy for Brownian motion to keep them suspended, and thus will settle over time because of the inherent density difference between the particle and its carrier fluid. These two fluids have very different applications as a result.